From the Kenosha News on 3-18-07

You can find the music you want on-line

            Do you ever hear a song on the radio or have a favorite running through your head and wish you had the song on CD or your iPod?  Chances are you can find and buy the song on-line.  The trick is to get at least a little useful information about the song to make your search workable.

            First, if you hear a song on the radio, try to get the title or artist.  Short of that, memorize a few of the words – preferably a unique phrase.  Also, note the radio station you heard it on and the approximate time it was playing.  Remembering (or trying to) part of the tune won’t help you find the song on the internet.

            If you have the song title and artist, you can go directly to iTunes or another music service and search for that song.  In iTunes, you can type the artist’s name or the song name in the Search box.  You might get a list of several selections.  You can listen to a portion of the song for free to make sure it’s the one you want.  You can then purchase the song for 99 cents to download.  My experience has shown that just about anything that you can hear on the radio is now available on iTunes.  Of course, there are other services that provide music in other formats, with different licensing options.  (See my article from 11/6/05 at www.sabbarpublications.com for a comparison.)

            If you only have a few words from a song, you’ll need to do some internet searching first to find out the name of the song.   There are many sites that have searchable databases of song lyrics.  For recent songs, I like www.sing365.com.  Make sure the you check the “full text” option, then type in your search terms.  Another useful one that has more oldies is www.letssingit.com; select “Lyrics” from the drop-down list, then type your search terms, then click Search.  Of course, you can also try a simple Google search.  If you’re looking for foreign songs, you can use the Google for that country or language, e.g. Google.fr for France, Google.de for Germany, etc. 

            A final way to find your song is to see if the radio station you heard it on has a station log with the titles listed by time.  Don’t wait too long to look it up; most stations only keep a few days back.  For example, suppose you heard a song you liked on 92.1 FM at about 11:30 am.  To find the web site, you’ll probably need to know the station call letters.  I used the low tech approach to this – the phone book.  I looked in the business section under W since all station names east of the Mississippi begin with W.   You could also try a Google search for “92.1 FM Wisconsin.”  Either way, you’ll find WEZY.  Another Google search leads me to www.literock921.com.  Click the purple bar at the top.  Under Station Log, select the day.  On the next page, select the approximate time and look for the song.  Other stations will have other ways to access their station log.

by Carol Sabbar from the Kenosha News on 3-18-07